The Most Common Hypermobility Acronyms You Need To Know

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There are lots of hypermobility acronyms to get your head around. If you’re anything like us when we were first got our diagnosis, we were overwhelmed by all the abbreviations used to describe hypermobility.

So, if you want to know what the difference is between HSD and EDS, or understand how JHS differs from BJHMS, you’ve come to the right place. We’ll even share with you another name for hypermobility.

Sit back, grab a notebook and pen (zebra-themed of course!) and discover the most common hypermobility acronyms you’re likely to come across.

Common Hypermobility Acronyms 

  • GJH: Generalized Joint Hypermobility – A condition in which a person has increased flexibility in most or all of their joints.
  • JHS: Joint Hypermobility Syndrome – A hereditary condition characterized by excessive joint mobility, joint pain, and other symptoms.

  • JH: Joint Hypermobility – A condition in which one or more joints have an increased range of motion.

  • BJHMS: Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome – People with BJHS may have joints that move beyond the normal range of motion without causing pain or discomfort. However, this can lead to other problems such as joint pain, sprains, and dislocations.

  • EDS: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome – A group of genetic disorders that affect the connective tissue, which provides support and structure to the body. Symptoms include joint hypermobility, skin that bruises or stretches, and chronic pain.

  • hEDS: Hypermobility-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome – The most common type of EDS. It primarily affects joint hypermobility and causes chronic pain, fatigue, and other symptoms.

  • EDS Type III/Type 3: Formerly used to describe the Hypermobility-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (hEDS), which is now the preferred terminology.

  • HSD: Hypermobile Spectrum Disorder – A term used to describe a spectrum of disorders characterized by joint hypermobility and related symptoms that do not meet the diagnostic criteria for JHS or EDS.

  • G-HSD: Generalized Hypermobile Spectrum Disorder – A subtype of HSD in which a person has hypermobility in most or all of their joints.

  • HMS: Hypermobility Syndrome – Another term used to describe joint hypermobility.

  • CH: Common Hypermobility – Also known as EDS.

  • HCTD: Hereditary Connective Tissue Disorder – A term used to describe a group of disorders that affect the connective tissue, including EDS and other related conditions.

  • BS: Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome – A term used to describe joint hypermobility that does not cause significant symptoms or impairments.

  • Pediatric generalized joint hypermobility (pGJH) – This category is for children who have generalized joint hypermobility without musculoskeletal complications, comorbidities, or skin and tissue involvement.

  • pGJH with skin involvement – A term used to describe children who have generalized joint hypermobility and have skin involvement.

  • pGJH with core comorbidities – This category is for children who have generalized joint hypermobility and have one or more core comorbidities.

  • pGJH with core comorbidities and skin involvement – This category is for children who have generalized joint hypermobility and have one or more core comorbidities and skin involvement.

  • Pediatric generalized hypermobility spectrum disorder (pgHSD) – musculoskeletal subtype: This category is for children who have generalized joint hypermobility and musculoskeletal complications, but do not have any comorbidities or skin and tissue involvement.

  • pgHSD, musculoskeletal subtype with skin involvement – This category is for children who have generalized joint hypermobility, musculoskeletal complications, and skin involvement.

  • pgHSD, systemic subtype – This category is for children who have generalized joint hypermobility and systemic complications, such as cardiovascular, respiratory, or endocrine problems.

  • pgHSD, systemic subtype with skin involvement – This category is for children who have generalized joint hypermobility, systemic complications, and skin involvement.


  • ROM: Range of Motion – Refers to the degree of movement that is possible in a joint. Hypermobile people have a larger range of motion than normal.

  • GI: Gastrointestinal – Refers to the digestive system. People with hypermobility typically have a lot of GI issues.

  • IBS: Irritable Bowel Syndrome – A common disorder that affects the large intestine, causing symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements. IBS is common in hypermobile people.

  • TMDs: Temporomandibular Disorders – A group of conditions that affect the jaw joint and muscles involved in chewing and speaking. Hypermobility and TMDs tend to occur together.

  • TMJH: Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility- The joint that connects the jawbone to the skull is the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Hypermobility often affects this joint.

  • OI: Osteogenesis Imperfecta – A group of genetic disorders that affect the bones, making them brittle and prone to fractures. Joint hypermobility is a common characteristic of OI.

  • SI joint: Sacroiliac Joint – The joint that connects the sacrum (the bone at the base of the spine) to the pelvis. The SI joint is often hypermobile and this causes significant back and hip pain. Closed-chain exercises for hypermobility are recommended to reduce this pain.

  • ASD: Autism Spectrum Disorder – A neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by difficulties in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. ASD and hypermobility are connected and often coincide in individuals.

  • ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder – A neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by difficulty paying attention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Researchers have found that hypermobility is linked to ADHD. As a result, many people with ADHD will also be hypermobile.

Hypermobility acronyms are a jumble of letters. We hope this list will help you understand your hypermobility a bit more. 

And, don’t worry, we’ll keep it updated as and when new hypermobility acronyms pop up!

Sources:

https://apdsupportuk.yolasite.com/resources/Acronyms%2C%20abbreviations%20and%20common%20terms.pdf

Author

  • Amy

    Amy lives with hypermobility spectrum disorder (HSD). She spent years not knowing what was wrong with her body, before eventually being diagnosed in her 30s. She has two young children - both of whom are hypermobile.