Children sitting on the sofa wearing shoes. A dog sits in between them.

Hypermobility And Shoes For Kids: Here’s How To Find A Pair That’s Right For Your Growing Child

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Hypermobility and shoes for kids can be a tricky thing to get right.

You probably don’t want to spend too much money considering kids’ feet grow up to two sizes per year. At the same time, it’s essential you buy good quality shoes that support your child’s hypermobile feet and reduces the risk of injury.

15% of kids are hypermobile

Hypermobility is commonly seen in children. Up to 15% of kids are hypermobile. Most will grow out of it, but some will remain hypermobile their entire lives.

As hypermobility is a genetic condition, this is most likely to happen when one or both of their parents are hypermobile.

So, the good news is that you may not be restricted to hypermobility-friendly shoes for all of your child’s life. But if they impacted by hypermobility long-term, make sure you’re shopping for the right shoes for their feet.

Things to look out for when buying shoes for hypermobile kids

When choosing shoes for a child with hypermobility, there are a few key things to look for:

  • Firm heel counter: The heel counter is the stiff back part of the shoe. It helps to keep the heel stable and prevent it from rolling in or out.

  • Midsole support: The midsole is the part of the shoe that sits between the outsole and the upper. It should be firm enough to provide support, but also flexible enough to allow for natural movement.

  • Wide toe box: The toe box is the front part of the shoe where the toes go. It should be wide enough to allow the toes to spread out naturally. Flat and wide feet are common in hypermobility so having good width in your kids’ shoes is crucial.

  • Breathable upper: The upper is the part of the shoe that covers the top of the foot. It should be made from a breathable material to keep the foot cool and dry. Hypermobility makes people sweat more than normal and the feet are often one of the main parts of the body that are affected.

  • Lace-up or Velcro closure: Lace-up shoes and Velcro shoes provide a more secure fit than slip-on shoes. Therefore, more support is provided.

  • A non-slip outsole: The outsole is the bottom part of the shoe. It should have a good grip to prevent slipping and falls which can cause injuries such as fractures in children.

It is also important to choose shoes that fit well. Shoes that are too small or too big can both cause problems for kids with hypermobility.

Related Post: Shoes Shopping Tips for Hypermobile People

Good kids’ shoes for hypermobility

Here are some specific shoe recommendations for kids with hypermobility:

  • Athletic shoes: Athletic shoes are a good option for kids with hypermobility because they provide good support and cushioning. Look for shoes with a firm heel counter, a supportive midsole, and a wide toe box. Some popular brands of athletic shoes that are good for kids with hypermobility include New Balance, ASICS, and Brooks.

  • Hiking shoes: Hiking shoes are another good option for kids with hypermobility because they provide good ankle support and traction. Look for shoes with a firm heel counter, a supportive midsole, and a wide toe box. Some popular brands of hiking shoes that are good for kids with hypermobility include Merrell, Keen, and Salomon.

  • Dress shoes: Dress shoes can be more challenging to find for kids with hypermobility, but there are some options available. Look for shoes with a firm heel counter, a supportive midsole, and a wide toe box. Some popular brands of dress shoes that are good for kids with hypermobility include Clarks, Ecco, and Geox.

If you are having trouble finding shoes that fit and support your child’s feet, you may want to consult with a podiatrist. A podiatrist can recommend specific shoes or orthotics that are right for your child’s individual needs.

Shoe brands suitable for hypermobility

Here are some specific shoe brands and styles that are good for kids with hypermobility:

  • New Balance: New Balance shoes are known for their good support and stability. They offer a variety of styles for kids of all ages, including running shoes, hiking shoes, and dress shoes.

  • ASICS: ASICS shoes are also known for their good support and stability. They offer a variety of styles for kids of all ages, including running shoes, hiking shoes, and dress shoes.

  • Saucony: Saucony shoes are known for their good cushioning and support. They offer a variety of styles for kids of all ages, including running shoes, hiking shoes, and dress shoes.

  • Brooks: Brooks shoes are known for their good cushioning and support. They offer a variety of styles for kids of all ages, including running shoes, hiking shoes, and dress shoes.

  • Ecco: Ecco shoes are known for their good support and stability. They offer a variety of styles for kids of all ages, including casual shoes, dress shoes, and sandals.

Making sure your kids’ shoes fit well

Here are some additional tips for choosing and caring for shoes for kids with hypermobility:

  • Have your child’s feet measured professionally every few months to make sure that they are wearing the correct shoe size.

  • Avoid shoes that are too tight or too loose. Shoes should fit snugly but comfortably.

  • Replace shoes regularly, especially if they show signs of wear and tear.

  • Make sure that your child’s shoes have good traction to prevent slipping and falls.

  • Encourage your child to wear their shoes whenever possible, even around the house.

By following these tips, you can help to ensure that your child with hypermobility has the shoes they need to stay comfortable and active.

Author

  • Amy

    Amy lives with hypermobility spectrum disorder (HSD). She spent years not knowing what was wrong with her body, before eventually being diagnosed in her 30s. She has two young children - both of whom are hypermobile.

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